EJCHS construction program earns national certification

With the banner celebrating its new status as a state- and nationally-certified construction program, are, from left East Jackson Comprehensive High School teacher David Adams and students Ryan Garrett, Hunter Knight, and Caleb Holcombe.

With the banner celebrating its new status as a state- and nationally-certified construction program, are, from left East Jackson Comprehensive High School teacher David Adams and students Ryan Garrett, Hunter Knight, and Caleb Holcombe.

The construction program at East Jackson Comprehensive High School has earned its national industry certification.

A rigorous evaluation process during the 2017-18 school year secured the recognition, issued jointly by NCCER, the National Center for Construction Education and Research, and CEFGA, the Construction Education Foundation of Georgia.

“This recognizes programs that are teaching the skills needed for a successful career path in the industry, based on stringent and proven criteria,” explained Todd Shultz, director of career, technical and agriculture education for the Jackson County School System. “Students enrolled in these programs benefit from relevant training and skill sets that lead to economic opportunity.”

The EJCHS construction program is now officially recognized as a CEFGA-Certified Training Center and an NCCER-Accredited Training and Educational Facility. Trainees enrolled in the program will receive national industry credentials as they complete the two organizations’ training requirements.

“These credentials are earned when a student passes both standardized written and performance assessments based on nationally recognized industry standards and competencies,” Shultz said. “Employers anywhere in the world can look up a student’s verified training record through the NCCER Automated National Registry system.”

David Adams, CTAE construction instructor is to be commended for his efforts in “working closely with business and industry to credential his program as industry-certified,” Shultz said. “He provides his students with authentic learning experiences and opportunities to earn lifetime industry credentials that will give them advantages when they begin their careers.”

Shultz said there are benefits to the community as well when programs like this provide employers with a skilled workforce, adding, “Jackson County School System is committed to preparing students for the future.”

Shultz said the school system was grateful to local business and industry representatives who were part of the onsite CEFGA team that examined the construction program for the industry certification credentialing, including Melissa Dyer and Jim Duren of Bowen & Watson; James Ellard of AC&P Plumbing; Laura Boswell, the JCSS work-based learning coordinator; Kim Mull of Charles Hill Electric; Kelly Moates and Stephen Liverman of Jackson County Habitat for Humanity; and Todd Corbett of Safety Services of GA.